A patient of mine from years ago left this note after she died. I have rewritten it here.

Dear Children- I did not take care of you like children deserve. When other kids were getting ready for school, you were trying to wake me up. You had to walk to the gas station alone,  with change you found scattered around so you could eat. You thought no one loved you and you were bad kids. You missed school and events because you had no one to take you. You got teased at school because you had to wear the same dirty clothes every day. I would be gone for days and you were scared. You would sit up all night wondering what you did wrong. You had no one to teach you anything. You didn’t come home to hugs, love, or even dinner. You never knew what was going to happen. You were never allowed to feel safe in this world. You were so confused when you were taken from me. I remember you screaming for me, with your hands outstretched screaming “Mommy! Mommy! Please don’t let them take Me.!” I saw your hearts break when I walked the other way. Every time the phone rang for the next 10 years you hoped it was me, and you were hurt every time that it wasn’t. I see all the pain you are in. I see the fear, the depression, and the anger. I know the torture I caused in your heart. I know I did this. I am sorry this is how you will remember me. But I understand.

Dear Mother- I know the pain I caused you. You had no one to turn to. It was your dream to be a mother and give love. I ruined your only hope in life. I took and took from you. You sat up crying at night begging God to help me. You didn’t know how to help, because no one took care of you. All you ever wanted was a family. You thought that having a family would take all your pain away. You had to work 2 jobs to replace the things I would steal. Everyone judged you for what I had done. I destroyed your self-confidence. You felt like you failed and you had to leave. I see the guilt in your eyes. I have taken your life from you. I am sorry that this is how you will remember me. But I understand.

Dear Brother- I stole from you, I took your money, your car, and I took all of our parent’s time. This left you with little time with them. You felt ignored and it hurt you. You withdrew from the world and isolated yourself. You had to grow up way to early. You became scared and isolated. I saw that affected your ability to know boundaries and how to have relationships. I see that is all with you still today. I did all of these things. I am sorry this is how you will remember me. But I understand.

Dear Sister- I took all of your toys and hid them. I ruined the toys that you loved the most on purpose. You were just a little girl that wanted love. You didn’t know why I was destroying the family. You saw me and trembled with fear. You couldn’t understand why I stole from mom and dad who had worked so hard. You tried so hard to help. You needed their love to. We missed your dance recitals because I stole the car. Your heart was broken and you didn’t understand how someone you loved so much could do this. You grew up scared. I see your pain, even if you try to hide it. I am sorry this is how you will remember me. But I understand.

Dear Father- You wanted to have a normal family. You took me places and to events all the time.  You hated your job, but you still went every single day to support us. No one loved you when you were a child. You never felt love as an adult. You were lonely. You were afraid to come home. Your marriage was hurt by me. You became depressed, so you drank more. I became an embarrassment to you. My issues robbed you of much of your life. I see the disappointment in your eyes. I am sorry this is how you will remember me. I understand.

I know that this is how I will remember you all.

Dear Brother- I remember going to sporting events together, playing outside, and laughing together. I remember the time you were so scared that dad was going to punish you about the mailbox, so I told him it was me. I remember letting you stay at my house after you had nowhere to go because of your drinking. I remember the not so nice things you tried to do to me. You were scared and lonely just like I was, so I never said anything. I remember coming back from treatment and you telling me how I had ruined everyone’s life. I am sorry you forget about the times I protected you. I was in pain when I did these things, but I understand so are you.

Dear Sister-I remember holding you at night when you were afraid. I remember when you made a mistake and Dad started coming after you. I remember jumping up and doing something worse on purpose so he would punish me instead. I remember you calling me your hero. I remember you clinging to me when we were young for protection. I remember taking you to the park to get away, and teaching you how to do hair. I am sorry that you forgot all of that. I am sorry you are in pain. I understand.

Dear Mother- I remember before it got bad, when you would tuck me in and hug me. It was so safe to be with you. I remember your love. I remember trying to make you happy because you would be so sad. I remember when you couldn’t take it anymore and left, I ran down the street looking for you outside for hours. I remember praying to God that you come back. I cried at night in my bed wishing you would just call me. I promised I wouldn’t be bad anymore. I remember when I told you what dad was doing, how your heart broke. I begged God to protect me. I am sorry you forgot all the good, and I am sorry for your pain, and I understand.

Dear Father- I remember the first time you hit me. You bought me candy so I didn’t tell. When I got older, if I didn’t want to get punished I would watch your “special” movies with you. It made you happy. You cried afterwards. I am sorry for whatever happened to you, to create the person I knew. I see you were in pain. I understand.

Dear children. I love you, I did the best I could. You are angels. I just did not know how to love, and I was scared.

I always wondered if anyone noticed…

Did anyone see when Dad was punching me?

Or when he took me into the room to watch “movies” with him?

Did anyone notice me crying when Mom left, because I was afraid what would happen?

Did God hear me?

Did anyone see what those older boys were doing to me?

Or notice I would be gone for hours as a teenager and come home drunk?

Or that I took the blame to protect you from being punished like I was?

Maybe you did, and you forgot. Maybe you thought it was better me than you.

I kept thinking someone would notice and they would do something. But no one ever did. No teachers, classmates, or anyone. No one spoke up. I guess they didn’t see. Or maybe they thought it was none of their business.

Thank you for telling me I was the bad one, and the problem child. I went to treatment and I got to feel better for a little while.

Until I would come back. No one understood why I would do so well, and when I got out of treatment, I would relapse.

I’m sorry you never could make it to family night at treatment because it was “my issue,” Not yours. That you were “fine.”

Maybe now that I am gone, your problems will be gone.

If you find that you are still in pain with me gone, and start to think maybe you were part of the problem, I am sorry for your pain. But it may be the best thing that’s ever happened to you.

Now that you have to look in the mirror, maybe now you can heal. It is the greatest gift I can give to you.

I used to wonder why God would allow such evil, poverty, and sadness on earth.

Then I realized, he is the one that should probably be asking us why WE ALLOW IT.

He gave us all the resources we need to live here equally. We have enough to end poverty, and help each other. He gave us all the tools we need.

We choose this.

We allow this, not God.

I love you all.

Alcoholism and Addiction are family diseases. Not every case is this extreme. However, the addict is usually the one acting out the dysfunction and is a sign of strength, not weakness.

If you take the strongest one and heal them, and send them back to the dysfunctional system, it will not work.

If we do not start treating the system, we will continue to have an epidemic.

Will you notice? Will you speak up?

Silence is consent.

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Ebook is only 3.99. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience.

“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon, and Balboa Press.

end psych photo

“Imagine all the good that could be done in the world if we offered treatment services – people getting real, talking about feelings, everyone included no cliques – and encouraging adolescents to take off their masks, rather than teach them how to build one and wear for the rest of their lives. “From the book “Taking The Mask Off” by Cortland Pfeffer/Irwin Ozborne

By Cortland Pfeffer

The mass shootings keep happening, despite blaming guns, mental illness and other things. Maybe that is because we are looking at the problem all wrong.

“Help me man!” says a voice of a man that stumbles into my office, “I don’t want to do it anymore. I need you to save my life.”

I was working at the walk-in mental health clinic when this distraught man sits down in front of me and clearly has hit his rock bottom. We start talking for a short time and we both feel a sense of familiarity with each other.

“Ozzy!?” He questions, “Well, I guess we both should have seen this moment coming.”

Ozzy was my high school nickname and the man sitting across from me that was pleading for me to save his life was one of my many, and probably worst, high school bully.

This man tormented me and made life a living hell and now here he was in a hell of his own and begging for me to bring him out of despair.

April 20, 1999:
Rewind the tape to April 20, 1999. It was our senior year and I have endured seven years of being a social outcast and bullied daily. By my senior year, I was part of the “popular” group but I realize it was not because I was accepted but it was more of a joke and a more covert bullying. Although I recognized it, I went along with it due to it being easier to handle than the overt bullying the years prior.

We all skipped school that morning to partake in International “Weed Day.” While we were innocently watching MTV, getting high, and laughing, suddenly my mindset changed. I grew very resentful at everyone as I knew that they were just inviting me so they could laugh at the awkward kid getting high. It was funny to see the kid that never talked suddenly opening his mouth. They were laughing at me, not with me, and I had enough.

I walked out of the house without saying a word and just walked home. No one called, no one wondered where I went, no one cared that I left. It was right around noon that morning as I began my walk.

At the exact same time, a thousand miles away, another group of high school seniors that had been bullied their entire lives and set as outcasts had a much different response. At 11:19 a.m. (local time), Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris had entered Columbine High School and began to open fire on the most deadly school shooting in United States History and forever change our world.

First and foremost, I need to explain sincerely that I do not condone their acts in any way and express sympathy for all that were affected by this tragedy. I also am a very non-violent person and could never see myself acting in such a way, but the purpose of this article is to show the two distinct paths my life could have took as I lived the life of the prototype of a school shooter.

A Life of Bullying:
Ever since entering Junior High School, I had no friends. I sat alone and barely said a word throughout the day of school unless prompted. Then, when I went home, it was more of the same. I was emotionally and mentally tormented and tried to hide in my room. I was even victimized further and accused of being “too sensitive.”

I had nowhere to go. No one ever took the time to step in.

A child that never talks, wears dirty clothes, and sits all alone and gets picked on daily and no one wanted to ask what was going on. Perhaps that would have been a “hard case” and nobody wanted to take the initiative.
Long before Columbine happened, I remember a kid in class joking about how I never talked. “Ozzy, you are the type of guy that shoots up a school. I better be nice to you for when you do something like that.”

Another time, while I was in the back of class writing football plays in my notebook, a girl (that also was fairly quiet), walks by and says “what are you writing, bomb codes?”
If people were saying this out loud, what were their private thoughts about me?

Then, the next day, April 21, 1999, I returned to school. Everyone in the school had eyes on me and looked me in the eye as if I had committed the same crime as Klebold and Harris. They weren’t friendly with me, instead they were more quiet and suspicious. The remaining month of my high school career went back to being ignored, which was perfectly fine with me as the phony “friendships” had run its course. Again, I didn’t want to act violently, I just wanted to escape and begin a new life.

Having a Social Outlet
The difference between neurosis and artistic, is that the artist has an outlet to express himself/herself. They neurotic keeps everything inside and brings about further self-torture.

“I’d be a savage beast, if I didn’t have this outlet to salvage me.” — Eminem

We all need a sense of belonging. Luckily for me, I happened to be an average athlete that was good enough to make the team. This is the only outlet that I had and I could release some of my built up anxieties. In addition, and more importantly, it allowed me to belong and be a part of something. It allowed a few people to recognize me and know about me.

A sense of belonging, above all else, is what each individual needs. Look at every mass shooter/killer in the history and they lacked connection.
If it wasn’t for athletics and not making the team, I would have had nothing. I am not sure how those last few years of high school would have turned out. It was because I was involved in these teams that the popular group took me on as their mascot. Again, although it was a form of bullying, I felt I was part of something and had a purpose. If I hadn’t made the team, or wasn’t into athletics, what would I have had? I would have been even more alone and perhaps I become even more alienated and who knows how that story ends.

To Those Who Have Been Bullied
Listen, I am as outcast as they come. I was even too odd for the weirdest people in the school. I have never fit in anywhere in life. As I grow older, I realized this is my greatest strength. If you don’t fit in with mainstream culture, it means you are doing something right. If you fit in with an insane society, that can not possibly make one “normal.”

If I could go back, I would embrace it more. In fact, that’s what I have done since then. It doesn’t have to be painful and life does get better once we truly embrace our life behind the mask.

Less than twenty years later, one of the biggest bullies walks into MY office and asks me to SAVE his life. Here I am living a meaningful, fulfilling life and this man is now begging for me to help him after he put me through hell. The thing is, I didn’t feel redemption, I felt sympathy and empathy for this man because I know how it feels and I don’t want anyone to have to go through that.

To all those who are bullies, remember it is hurt people that hurt people. They are hurting very deeply. Someone who is fully secure and self-confident has no interest in harming the life of another.

I view myself as a non-violent pacifist. I hate guns. But, I also look back and see that I was maybe only a few situations/scenarios away from becoming Dylan Klebold. At the same time, my life changed dramatically in less than twenty years to working with and preventing the future Dylan Klebolds of the world.

Walk Up, Not Out
While this pains me to say it, the conservatives got this one right. In response to the Stoneman Douglas shooting in 2018, high school students around the country organized a “walk out” to protest gun violence. Again, I agree with the students, I have always been for gun control to the point I am anti-gun.

But, I can also acknowledge when the other side has a good point. The idea of walk up, not out, has to do with explaining that bullying is the cause of the school shootings. Instead of walking out, the students should walk up and get to know each other – this is accurate. The only thing that bothers me, is the conservatives use this only as a means to push their own agenda – their guns.

If schools would take time to teach classes on having people openly share and express their feelings with one another, it would form tighter bonds. I remember in one class we had to write a very personal essay. We sat in a table of four other students and passed our paper around. Even something as simple as this helped us connect with each other as we saw beyond each other’s masks.

There should be more of this. There should be a treatment-style class in which the group shares their inner world with each other and work on forming meaningful relationships. If we start doing this at a young age it would end nearly all school shootings.

For those that have been bullied, I would like to share that there is also a place to go. There are support groups around the world, such as AA and NA, that understand the concept of unconditional acceptance. You can sit in a room with a police officer and doctor that are sitting alongside a homeless person and they understand each other. They talk about real things and form meaningful connections. No one is judged and everyone is accepted.

The opposite of love is not hate; the opposite of love is indifference. I don’t feel people hated me, but people were indifferent towards me everywhere I went.

Once again, the answer is love.

51npgdjuqol.jpg

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience
“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble , and Balboa Press.

phoenix-resurrection

 

“The myth of the phoenix is engaging and symbolic. This beautiful bird is said to live 500 years. , and then, at the time of its death it creates a nest and while still in it, sets it on fire. Out of the fiery hot ashes of its own demise springs a new phoenix. Our lives will represent the rising of the phoenix if we allow it. Out of the fire and ashes of our crash and burn lives, we are offered a new beginning. This mythical bird never comes out of its ashes despondent and dejected; it arises with great power and beauty, undamaged and strengthened by the flames of its self-created fire. We don’t need to gaze upon the ashes of our burnt out dreams with a heavy heart. We are encouraged by the power of this timeless myth to rise up-to be re-birthed-into a new beginning, a new opportunity and sometimes, a whole new life.”

I have heard a lot lately of many in the field of addiction saying that the word “addict” is negative and should no longer be used. It creates stigma, it causes shame, and it should not be used and it is offensive. We are trying to take away stigma and use more positive language. Which is good, and for the most part, it makes sense. However, on this one I do not see it. Why are we defining being an addict as bad?

Most people, when they speak about addiction, they will tell you of the terrible things that happen to them and their families. The awful days, the time in jail, and the hangovers. I can tell you that is all true. Jail, mental hospitals, and complete destruction. I hid alcohol in dirty diapers so no one would look. I screwed up about every holiday and special occasion for 8 years. I went to jail, treatment, and psych hospitals many times. I lost a 4 bedroom, 4 bathroom house.I lost a daughter. I lost a best friend. I lost a Mercedes, I lost a BMW. Yes, it is terrible. It is awful. It is also the best thing that ever happened to me. I think it is the greatest gift that has ever been given to me. I am proud to call myself an addict. Call me an addict, I am not afraid of that. I want that.

It was a gift because I lost myself, I killed myself. My false self. I became awakened through addiction. I found out what was important, it was similar to me as in the movie, “The Grinch who stole Christmas.” when the whos down in Whoville have all the presents ripped away from them by the Grinch. The next morning, they still sing, and they finally understood what Christmas is truly about. Alcohol was my Grinch, and although I am sad about the pain, I would not change a thing. The thing I am most grateful for is my alcoholism, drug addiction, and my recovery. Thank you alcohol, my Grinch.

“Wake up, wake up, it is time to go!” Words I waited for, my whole life. I hear these words.. “It is time to wake up.” It was time, it was time for my only son to be born. This was my dream, the one thing, the one thing I wanted, a son. It was time for him to be born.

However, a secret that I would never say out loud at the time was inside my head, and the thinking was this, “God I hope this is over so I can get a drink, this cannot be real, and she is just faking it. This is ridiculous, I need to be able to drink tomorrow, it is Saturday, and I want to golf and drink.”

After he was born, this is what I did the next morning. I went out and drank while he was at the hospital. I missed the first week of his life. Then when he was a week old, after I had sworn off drinking and drugs. We were at a huge family gathering. I drank, and did drugs.

I was driven to the hospital due to a possible overdose and I jumped out of the car and ran. I was run down by my 240 pound brother in law. How he outran me on that day I will never know. He was the tortoise, and he won the race. It was the most important race of my life, and I had to lose. Thankfully, he ran me down and drug me into the hospital. Then, I began to “wake up.”

It wasn’t one aha moment. It is a continual process, one step up, then 2 back.
Constantly learning, like an infant. Because that is what you are. You are being re born.
When I heard, “It was time to wake up.” It was right. In more ways than one.

Enlightenment is a destructive process, it takes away all you think you know. It is a blessing that feels like an injustice.

Adversity rips away everything from you except what is real. When this happens, it hurts, but then you have a sense of peace, and all that is there is love. Nothing else mattered. I would never have gotten to this part without a collapse.

“For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse. So collapse. Crumble. This is not your destruction, this is your birth.”

I now know what life is about, what is important. I know the reasons why we say do not judge people. I have seen the true power of love. I have seen magic. I have seen what it feels like to be at the end, with nowhere to go, and people thinking you are some monster. It taught me who the real people that loved me, I saw everyone’s true character.

I have seen how we get caught up in money, in things. I know the emptiness we feel, yes we are empty, but we are all part of one. We must love each other. Little things do not disturb me, my thoughts are just that, thoughts. I let them pass. It is ok to feel emotions, they are a sign. I finally decided to be my true self, the one I was hiding for so many years. The one that wants to love everyone and tell everyone how great they are. The one that writes, and finds beauty in every moment. The one who talks openly about everything.

Others still try to push that true self down. They benefit from the false self I created. However, recovery taught me about resentments, and cleaning my side of the street. I have learned to love myself, to have gratitude, to have affirmations and meditation. To have a good group of people that you trust. Do not be ashamed if you relapse. Shame creates isolation, and fear, and depression. Be open, it will likely happen, learn from it and it is not a mistake. It then becomes a learning experience.

Realizing I had a false self that died, I saw that I had never even known who I was. So it was scary, but it was fun. I reinvented myself, or started from scratch. I went to plays, tried new things, it is fun finding out who you are. Of course you lose people, but you lose the right people, those that only benefited from your false self. I also gained new people. My world has never been more happy and peaceful.

Others pushed this true self down before, that is where the drinking came in, because it helped bring him out. Now I sing out loud, act goofy, play, speak my emotions, love, and let the thoughts go. I have found that you must go to the roots. If you just remove a dead leaf, a new one grows. You must go into your tangled roots and untangle them.

Fix the roots, the plant then grows differently. I have learned that love is the one thing that the more you give away of, the more you get. Like the Huey onion plant in Vietnam, when you cut it, the closer you cut it to the roots, the larger it grows. But you cannot cut the roots. Love is like that. The more you give away without destroying your roots, the more you get back. This was all learned through addiction.

I am at peace. And it is all because of my addiction and recovery. There was pain, but because of the pain came great joy. It was like getting a second chance at life, it was a rebirth. I got to find out who I am, and I still do that every day. Every moment builds on the new me.

My son was born, and a week later, so was I. We were born together.

If he ever reads this I hope he sees that he was my phoenix, my rising of the ashes. Maddoc, your life began by saving mine. Now we grow together. You are my miracle. My addiction is my gift.

I had been passed out for over 3 days. I finally got to the hospital and grabbed him. People were rolling their eyes I am sure. Someone snapped this picture. I was whispering to him in his ear as a cried, “I love you Maddoc, I am not sure if I can do this, I am going to try my best. No one thinks I can do this and I am scared. But, my love for you is going to be more powerful. All I have left is love. Let’s be born together.”

I have not drank since. I am a better father and person, and do better at my job and my relationships all because of addiction. It is a gift.

So please, call me an addict.
Thank you addiction.

Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution $3.99

taking-the-mask-off-stigma-barriers-mental-health-addiction-spiritual-solution

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience.

“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon, and Balboa Press.

Edit

 

By Irwin Ozborne

“If tomorrow, women woke up and decided they really liked their bodies, just think how many industries would go out of business.Dr. Gail Dines

A mother comes home after a stressful day at work with many tiny worries racing through her mind. She pulls in the driveway and opens the garage door to see her 16-year-old daughter hanging from the rooftop, lifeless, dead, from suicide. She was too fat, so she developed an eating disorder, then was too skinny and “sick” and eventually she gives her reason in a note that is summed up with the words, “soon the pain will be gone.”

Who is at fault? The parents, counselors, school, bullies at school? Partially, all of the above are to blame. But the greater culprit that allows this to continue is the media and beauty industry.

There is an old parable that explains of a small town that suddenly notices a baby floating down the river and all the people come together to rescue the child. Soon, they discover another baby and another and another all floating down the river. All of the resources of the community are put together to take care of the babies coming down the river but they can not keep up and can not save everyone. Eventually, someone offers the suggestion, “Let’s go upstream and see who is throwing all the babies in the river, then we can stop the problem at its core.” This is where the beauty industry is to blame.

Beauty in Western society has become a serious illness. In fact, you could call it an epidemic. Young women in America are being poisoned daily by corporations, advertisements, television, school, friends, and even family members. From the time they are young, they are engrained with the message “beauty is everything and everything can be obtained with beauty.”

Eighty-One percent of 10-year-old girls have a fear of being fat! Another study by the University of Central Florida showed that nearly 50% of girls, aged three to six, were already concerned about their weight. Nearly half of all fourth-grade girls have begun dieting. And by the time they reach high school, 90% of girls are dieting, while only 10% are actually overweight. But the fear of being fat is gone by the time they hit 17-years-old, because now more than four out of every five girl are “unhappy” with their body (Ross, 2012).

I saw a post that said “54% of women would rather get hit by a truck than be fat.” I laughed at the exaggerated message only to do more research and found out that it was not as far-fetched as I first believed. Thankfully, I have been unable to find any validity to that number, but some of the online posts about this scare me.

“How big is the truck, LOL?”

“How fast is the truck going? Will I get hurt?”

But, according to Radar Systems, nearly half of adolescent girls would rather have cancer, experience the death of a parent, or a nuclear war instead of getting fat. And these numbers are only dealing with weight. We haven’t even dug into the full beauty epidemic.

Actress and makeup artist Eva Devergilis states that every woman that sits in her chair apologizes for the way they look. This includes all ages, race, body types, weight, etc. Every single woman that comes in to see her apologizes for their looks. Why have we placed such an emphasis on beauty and why have we set the standard so high that nobody can be satisfied?

“Being a model is like winning the genetic lottery…Planning to be a model when you grow up is like planning to win the Powerball,” said professional model Cameron Russel, “and those are not pictures of me. They are constructions made by professional makeup artists, photographers, hairstylists and photoshop.”

The amount of time and money women spend in regards to their appearance is keeping them out of developing into a more complete person. As Jason Whitlock wrote in an article in the Kansas City Star, “How many more young girls out there are aspiring to be Beyoncé as compared to Hillary Clinton?”

Beauty is the main form of currency for women in Western culture. If you have beauty, you can have anything. They can not escape it because it is everywhere – television, internet, social media, etc. Their image is observed everywhere, by everyone, including themselves. This leads to beauty and image as the number one priority in the lives of young women and children.

But beauty is not the problem. It is wonderful and should be admired to some extent.  The real culprit of the beauty epidemic is a three-part problem which is controlled by the corporate America and the media (which subsequently profits off corporate America and has no urgency to report anything that opposes their financial interests). It stems from creating 1) the belief that beauty is the most important and powerful thing in the world; 2) this is what beauty looks like; and 3) you do not look like this.

With this system, you will always be stuck at number three. You will constantly be buying products, having surgeries to try to reach the level of beauty defined by corporations. The same corporations, mind you, which are selling you the products. It is a giant marketing scheme. None of it is true.

And women know this. But that is how incredibly powerful the propaganda system works. We know outer beauty is not everything, we know that the images they portray are not possible, but we also know we do not look like that. But at that point, we need to just say “and that is ok.”

  1. Beauty is the most important and powerful thing in the world.

You are told that beauty is the most important thing in the world. If you are not beautiful, you are not important, you are not successful, and you really have no value to the world. This message begins with the media, brainwashes everyone valuable in our lives, and trickles into our brains from the time we are young.

The media (television, films, videos, billboards, magazines, movies, music, newspapers, fashion designers, social media, and other internet sites) bombard us with body images throughout the day. Young children spend around six to seven hours per day enamored with these messages (Brown, JD 2002). Chris Downs and Sheila Harrison found that one out of every 3.8 television commercials portrays a message about attractiveness. They went on to state that the average viewer sees about 14 of these messages a day and more than 5,200 advertisements related to attractiveness each year (Downs, 2011).

By the time the average teenage girl in Western society reaches age 18, she has seen nearly 100,000 television advertisements about the importance of attractiveness. This does not include seeing images on the internet, facebook friends, or other media outlets which account for an additional 5,000 plus images per week! (Wiseman, 2012)

  1. This is what beauty looks like.

The same people shoving this message down our throats are the same people defining beauty. This definition is always changing. Look at the images of “beauty” just in the last century and how much the “ideal body image” continues to change. This is not by accident. They want you to continue to strive for an unachievable goal. Therefore, you are always in the quest for more.

A study showed that women experience an average of 13 negative thoughts about their body each day, while 97% of women admit to having at least one “I hate my body” moment each day. The comparisons damage the minds of nearly all women each day.

And this “ideal image” you see in the media is 23% below that of the average woman in America – 20 years ago this difference was only eight percent. The gap between reality and ideal image is widening by the day, with Vogue’s Gisele Bunchen (5’11, 125 pounds) at 25% below normal body weight.

  1. You do not look like this.

Without directly saying this, this message is implicitly implied. A study showed that observing an image of body image through the media leads women would increase depression and shame while reducing self-esteem and body satisfaction.

And that is the formula they use. Present an image that is unobtainable in which they know will cause women to feel bad and hate how they look. Then repeat the image over and over – as the Hitler propaganda system has proven to work – until they believe it to be true. Then, they will spend their money on your product, watch your programming, and have your surgery.

Oppression only Survives Through Silence

“I distrust those people who know so well what God wants them to do, because I notice it always coincides with their own desires.”Susan B. Anthony

This is the implicit oppression of women in Western society.  For the majority of our country’s history there has been explicit oppression of women, people of color, homosexuals, mentally ill, and basically anybody who is not a white male. This only survives without anyone speaking out. Then comes the implicit, covert oppression which takes place by subliminally putting messages out through the media that one race, gender, or orientation is inferior.

There is a universally accepted concept that “nobody is perfect.” The concept of being perfect means to be without flaw and to hold all desired qualities and characteristics. So here we have the concept of “perfect” in which the beauty industry teaches us is the ultimate goal to happiness and joy, yet we are also constantly reminded that “nobody is perfect.”  Basically, stating that it is impossible to ever achieve this goal. It becomes a never-ending cycle of self-hatred, followed by seeking external pleasure to fill internal voids.

In reality, the opposite is actually true; which is also the antidote to this epidemic. The idea that nobody is perfect is the biggest lie you have ever been told. The truth is that everybody is perfect. To be perfect means to have all the desired qualities and characteristics – but it never says whose desires. If we can change the train of thought to realize that everything about us is already perfect, there would be no more comparison, and trying to be something we are not. Instead, loving what we already possess and loving everything about everyone else.

This is a concept known as unconditional love. It means to love without condition, without judgment, and to accept completely as it is. This means to not complain, question, or have a desire to change, but to accept perfectly as it is in the present moment.

While the concept seems simple, it is quite difficult. In fact, most people spend their lifetimes trying to achieve unconditional love.  In essence, unconditional love is synonymous with enlightenment.  Both refer to removing labels, judgments, and untruths, and seeing the world as it was presented to us through the lens of our true self. It means removing our mask and seeing the world for how it is, without its mask.

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Ebook is only 3.99. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience.

“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon, and Balboa Press.

 

 

On July 31st, 2004, David Carmichael took his 11 year old sons life.  We discuss the tragedy, the aftermath, his criminal trial, and what he is doing now.

Listen on ITunes, Spreaker, Sound cloud, you tube, and on our site:

 

Spreaker:

 

You Tube:

 

 

 

ITunes:

Itunes interview with David Carmichael about the Murder of his son

 

 

 

 

SoundCloud:

 

 

 

 

WordPress:

Ep 012 Pills that Kill David Carmichael’s medication induced psychosis leads to the murder of his son

 

51npgdjuqol.jpg

 

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience
“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble , and Balboa Press

 

hugclub

“I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear; knowing what must be done does away with fear.” Rosa Parks

By Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne

Every Wednesday morning for the past few months I have seen the same patient around 7:00 a.m. I would bring her a sausage and egg McMuffin every morning and sometimes a fish sandwich in the afternoon – a violation of company rules.

The “rules” also tell me that I am not supposed to pick up her medications, not to disclose personal information, and to never give hugs to patients. But we all face moments in life in which we realize that rules no longer apply to present circumstances.

Nearly sixty years ago, on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, an African-American woman refused to follow the rules and orders of a bus driver demanding she gives up her seat to a white person. The rules no longer applied to Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights movement began. A couple decades prior in Germany, Oskar Schindler and Karl Plagge were members of the Nazi Party who saw the “rules” of the time meant systematic extermination of people. They saw the rules no longer applied, with each of them finding a way to save thousands of lives along the way.

Parks, Schindler, and Plagge shared one thing in common. They recognized injustice, deliberately refused to follow the “rules” of their time, and put their personal life at risk in an effort to do the right thing. While these are all extreme examples, they all also started with one simple act which catapulted a movement.

Today, let’s start our own revolution. As they say it will not be televised. That is because only hate and corruption is televised. The real revolution is a return to love.

This woman that I would visit had just lost her only son about three years ago to suicide. She was devastated and never recovered. When I stopped by, we would just talk about life, my kids and family, politics, and the world we live in. It was the highlight of her day. She always asked me for hugs every time I came, and against staff advice, I obliged.

She was incredibly lonely and her depression had reached the point in which it was physically debilitating. She was in so much emotional pain that it was a struggle to get out of bed each day. I would help her get up and walk around outside for a few minutes to help boost her mood.

Then our Wednesday meetings always ended with a simple hug.

I find it ironic that these things violate rules. This has been scientifically / biologically proven that hugging actually releases a hormone called Oxytocin, which is a natural antidote to stress and naturally lifts ones mood. Oxytocin is also released by looking into another’s eyes, a simple holding of the hand, patting on the back, petting an animal, etc.

In fact, studies have shown that teachers that give a warm pat on the back to students will typically fare better in testing and that sports teams that make more personal contact (i.e. high fives, exuberant hugs) are more successful. It has more of a scientific backing than that of antidepressants.

Today, as I was walking towards her door, something felt different. I knocked on the door and waited as I felt something turning in my stomach.

There was no answer. She was dead.

I am not sure the cause of death, but likely will find out in the coming days once the coroner can run an autopsy. But she is gone, she has passed away and will be reunited with her son. Ask me if I regret breaking these rules for the past three months?

On her answering machine, you hear my voice saying, “I can’t come this morning. I have to bring my kids to school. But I promise I’ll be there tomorrow with the egg McMuffin.”

Before I headed to her house this morning, I was feeling very depressed about some other things going on in my personal life. I wasn’t going to bring her food today and my plan was to let her know that I could no longer keep doing this for her. As these thoughts were going through my mind, I was able to slow myself down and remind myself “just because I am depressed does not mean I should add to her pain.”
Last week, I blew her off during our visit. I was short, rushed, and didn’t want to be “bothered.”  She pleaded me to stay longer, but my occupied mind would not allow me to be present that day.

“I promise we will chat more next week,” I told her. Without knowing, that next meeting never came.

And that is what I regret. I was too busy with things going on in my own world, that I missed out on an opportunity to make another person’s day brighter.

Every interaction matters, every hug matters, every moment matters. Being a man does not mean who is the most productive, busy, finishing paperwork on time, or rising to the top. No, being a man has to do with going beyond our ego and making true, meaningful connection with another soul. Give someone a hug, someone in need.

I am starting a hug club. I’m going to hug people openly just the way we did when we were children before society scared us away from loving our neighbor and fellow man. If I see someone walk in the room that I am happy to see, I am going to hug them. If I see someone distressed, I will hug them and allow their body to naturally heal the way we were created to do so.
This is my vow and I encourage others to do the same.

I know we will get weird looks, laughed at, mocked, and ridiculed. But so did Rosa Parks. A real man does not concern himself over the opinions of those still living behind their mask, because a real man understands that that hug may be saving a life.

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience

“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon,   Barnes and Noble , and Balboa Press

 

In Ep 009 Make America Sane Again: Advocating change for the mental health system, we speak with Emily Cutler. Emily is an assistant Editor for the Website Mad in America and the founder of Southern California against forced treatment. Emily discusses her work for Mad in America, mental health reform, and shares her inspirational personal story.

 

You can Listen on iTunes, sound cloud, Speaker, and here on our site. Links are below:

 

 

Spreaker:

 

ITunes:

Itunes Ep 009 Making America Sane Again Advocating change in the mental health system

 

Sound cloud:

 

WordPress:

Ep 009 Making America Sane Again W Emily Cutler

 

Brooke Feldman lost her mother at an early age, spent her teenage years in the juvenile justice system, psychiatric hospitals, and treatment centers. She became addicted to opioids, had eating disorders, and was suicidal. She now writes for the Huffington Post and is getting her Masters Degree and an Ivy league school. Brooke has a blog and her writing can be seen at https://brookemfeldman.com/, her Huffington Post writing can be seen at https://www.huffingtonpost.com/author/brooke-m-feldman

Listen on ITunes, Soundcloud,or our Website, Links are below.

Listen on Sound cloud:

 

Listen On ITunes:

Itunes Ep 008 Different Kind of Freedom Fighter: Advocacy for the Inner Child
Listen on WordPress:

Ep 008 Different Kind of Freedom Fighter Advocacy for the Inner Child WithBrooke Feldman

 


“In 1492, the natives discovered they were Indians, discovered they lived in America, discovered they were naked, discovered that the Sin existed, discovered they owed allegiance to a King and Kingdom from another world and a God from another sky, and that this God had invented the guilty and the dress, and had sent to be burnt alive who worships the Sun the Moon the Earth and the Rain that wets it.” ― Eduardo Galeano

By Irwin Ozborne

A good friend of mine, a member of the Republic of Lakotah, has a meeting with her first grade son’s elementary school principal. Apparently, her six-year-old was being defiant in classroom.

What were these defiant actions?

Well, upon his teacher explaining Columbus Day and honoring the courageous and brave sailor who discovered this land in 1492, he had a couple of questions for the teacher. He wanted to know how it was possible that he discovered a land in which his ancestors had lived for 30,000 years, he wanted to know what happened to all the people who lived here in 1491, and he wanted to know why the man responsible for invading his native land and slaughtering his ancestors was being honored.

I would love to just be a fly on the wall of that meeting with the elementary school principal.

Christopher Columbus did NOT discover America.

There, I said it. The first thing we have been told about in our early childhood is a complete fabrication of the truth. But, that is only the beginning of the secret atrocities that shaped our nation that we know today.

The Spanish Conquest of the Americas, preceded by Columbus’s “discovery” resulted in mass assimilation, raping, slaughtering, enslaving, and intention to wipe out all evidence of more than 100 million indigenous people to the land. These atrocities include:

  • Forced hard labor
  • Abducting and selling children into the sex trade as young as nine-years-old
  • Mass raping of women and children
  • Amputated limbs if you were not producing enough
  • Buried alive or burnt alive if you were resistant to the conquerors demands
  • Offering cash rewards for the scalps of men, women, and children as proof of murder
  • Intentionally spreading smallpox disease by means of biological warfare
  • Forced removal from homes and land onto small reservations with unlivable circumstances
  • Death march of more than one-thousand miles to these reservations, in which if you were unable to continue the walk you were left for dead and unable to assist dying family members
  • On these same reservations which were “reserved” for the indigenous people, once this land was deemed valuable, the agreement was broken and they are forced to move once again. (All 370 treaties signed between the U.S Government and Indian nations have been broken by the United States.
  • Public execution of those who do not follow orders
    • Murdering children by slamming against stone and tree trunks
    • Slicing open pregnant women’s stomach on public display as taunting those who do not comply
  • Labeled as hostile savages if not in complete compliance from the oppressor
  • These same mass murders become labeled as heroes after sweeping through villages and slaughtering unarmed civilians
  • Systematically kidnapping all children and forcing them to a boarding school system in which they are molested, beaten, forbidden to speak native language and brainwashed into becoming “Americanized”
  • Not entitled citizenship in their own land until 1924
  • Not included in the initial civil rights act; did not receive equal rights until 1968
  • Not allowed to practice their own religion until 1978
  • In the 1970’s the attendance at these brutal boarding schools peaked and it was not until 1975 that the United States Government emphasized reduction in boarding schools with most of them finally closing in the 1980s and 1990s. In 2007, there were still 9.500 American Indian children in boarding schools
  • Traditional lifestyle mocked and ridiculed in mass media and in the classroom – socially acceptable to discriminate against
  • Altered their history by ignoring and denying the truth for the past four centuries.

These were the policies of our government, the United States of America, and/or the Pope of the Catholic faith. This wasn’t done by aliens from outer space; No, it was done by aliens from the East. Entered illegally into an occupied land with force to subjugate and exterminate the civilizations that had existed for 30,000 years.

Thousand-mile death march, concentration camps, forced assimilation, mass killings by starvation/disease, forced to change culture/beliefs…this all sounds familiar.

In John Toland’s book “Adolf Hitler,” he comments on the Furor’s admiration of the American Genocide:

Hitler’s concept of concentration camps as well as the practicality of genocide owed much, so he claimed, to his studies of English and United States history. He admired the camps for Boer prisoners in South Africa and for the Indians in the Wild West; and often praised to his inner circle the efficiency of America’s extermination—by starvation and uneven combat—of the red savages who could not be tamed by captivity.

 

He was very interested in the way the Indian population had rapidly declined due to epidemics and starvation when the United States government forced them to live on the reservations. He thought the American government’s forced migrations of the Indians over great distances to barren reservation land was a deliberate policy of extermination. Just how much Hitler took from the American example of the destruction of the Indian nations is hard to say; however, frightening parallels can be drawn. For some time Hitler considered deporting the Jews to a large ‘reservation’ in the Lubin area where their numbers would be reduced through starvation and disease.

But, that is kind of a harsh reality to teach children in grade school. So, we could probably soften it up a little…or change it altogether.

Discover, Invasion, or Conquer?

Discover is defined as finding something in the course of a search. Invade is identified as an armed force or its commander entering a country/region so as to subjugate or occupy. Conquer means to overcome and take control of a place or people by use of military force.

Discover technically could be applied as something was found, but the problem is that something already had belonged to someone for 30,000 years. For perspective, it has only been 2,014 years since Christ was born. That means the first indigenous people reached the Americas 27,986 years ago; whereas Europeans have only been here for 522 years.

The most interesting part about the definition of invade is the word “subjugate” and the fact that Columbus used this exact word upon his first encounter with the Taino people:

“They … brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things, which they exchanged for the glass beads and hawks’ bells. They willingly traded everything they owned… . They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features…. They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane… . They would make fine servants…. With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.”

“With fifty men we could SUBJUGATE them and do whatever we want.” Interestingly enough the term subjugate is defined as bringing under domination or control, especially by conquest.

Conquest is simply the act of conquering, which is interlocked with our final term. It is indisputable that the place and people were taken control of by military force. In fact, the exact term in history is labeled, “The Spanish Conquest.”

Clearly, Columbus’s voyage may have initially been a “discovery,” but upon his first impression of the people of this island it quickly turned to an “invasion.” Following his death, Hernán Cortés and Francisco Pizzaro carried out the tasks of conquering the Americas.

Now, before you disregard this article as a wacky conspiracist nut, anti-American post, please understand that this is more about seeking the other side of the story. It is about viewing the landing of Columbus’s ships on May 12, 1492, from the occupants of that land – the Taino and Arawaks perspective.

Columbus Early Life:

 

Born as Cristofor Colombo (Italian name; Spanish: Cristóbal Colón; Portuguese: Cristóvão Colombo; and American: Christopher Columbus) was born in Genoa, Italy, in 1451. He grew up working on ships and began sailing at age 10. Upon delivering goods to northern Europe in 1476, upon his return his ship was burnt by a group of French sailors and he swam to shore in Portugal. He remained in Portugal and started working for the kingdom, which had the finest fleet in the world at this time.

During the middle ages, the kingdoms of Europe made their wealth by trading with Asia. But in 1453, the Turkish Empire cut off all land routes and the race to find a sea route to Asia had begun. Columbus sailed along the coasts of Africa, trading with the colonies and learning of the currents and wind patterns of the Atlantic. In 1487, a different Portuguese sailor, Bartholomeu Dias made his way around the southern tip of Africa and discovered the eastern coast; giving strong belief to a quicker route to Asia by sea.

Columbus had already believed the world was smaller than that of the common-held belief of this time. Once Dias’ made this discovery, Columbus’s desire to sail west intensified as he had been seeking sponsorship for a trip across the Atlantic as early as 1484.

(Please note that nobody in the 15th century believed that the world was flat. This is an outright lie by the American school system. The Greek philosopher Pythagoras first made this theory nearly 7,500 years before Columbus was born. Aristotle, 4th century B.C., added more proof by observing the stars. As historian Jeffrey Russel Burton states, “With extraordinary few exceptions, no educated person in the history of Western Civilization from the third century B.C. onward believed that the Earth was flat.”)

Columbus was rejected funding from Portugal, twice by Italy, Spain, England, and France. However, upon the Spanish kingdom conquering Granada they were more willing to fund his voyage of three ships and 80 men. Struggling to find a crew, Queen Isabella released prisoners early to join the voyage along with other criminals, conquistadors, and pig farmers. Also, following Spain’s capture of Granada, there were some unemployed military men that were sent along on Columbus’s voyage.

For it was these men that did not fear dying at sea, as it was for more appealing than what life had in store for them in Spain. And in August of 1492, after eight years of trying to make a voyage around the world, Columbus set sail seeking the riches of Asia.

First Voyage:

The first voyage to the so-called “new world” was highly unsuccessful, despite the credit and admiration it has received. After weeks at sea and a disgruntled crew of men, Columbus gave an ultimatum of finding land in the next two days or head back to Spain – dated October 10, 1492. As unfortunate fate would have it, two days later Rodrigo de Triana was the first to spot an island, which is modern day Dominican Republic. However, with a large payout at stake, Columbus claimed that he actually spotted the light the night before – hence, claiming the lifetime pension from King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.

Columbus claimed the land for Spain and renamed it San Salvador although it had been occupied for thousands of years by the Taino, Arawak, and Lucayans (all extremely hospitable per many written accounts). Early estimates believe there were up to three million indigenous people living in the Caribbean; whereas more recent studies believe that number to be closer to eight million.

As written in his journals upon his first encounter with the Taino:

“These people have no religious beliefs, nor are they idolaters. They are very gentle and do not know what evil is; nor do they kill others, nor steal; and they are without weapons.”

Columbus quickly captured a handful of Taino to help guide him to find gold, while putting many into forced labor and sent thousands back to Spain to be sold as slaves (although most of them died on the journey back across the Atlantic).

“As soon as I arrived in the Indies, in the first island which I found, I took some of the natives by force, in order that they might learn and might give me information of whatever there is in these parts. And so it was that they soon understood us, and we them, either by speech or by signs, and they have been very serviceable.”

Merry Christmas – 1492 Style

 

After a few weeks exploring around Cuba, Columbus made his way back toward Hispaniola (Dominican Republic). On Christmas Eve, the Santa Maria shipwrecked before making it to land. The Arawak Indians saw the men struggling and their chief ordered all his men to swim out to sea and help the settlers to safety – including the chief himself.

The Arawak invited the settlers into their home. Columbus wrote of the kind hospitality of the Arawaks:

“They are artless and generous with what they have, to such a degree as no one would believe but him who had seen it. Of anything they have, if it be asked for, they never say no, but do rather invite the person to accept it, and show as much lovingness as though they would give their hears.”

With not enough room on the two remaining ships, Columbus left 39 men behind to settle a fort in which he called La Navidad.

When Columbus returned to Spain, his stories of the new world impressed the King and Queen – Mostly due to his large exaggerations of the amount of gold present in the Caribbean. The Spanish royalty granted him another voyage, but this time with 17 ships, 1200 men, livestock, and weapons.

Columbus consistently wrote about the kindness of the people that he encountered on his first voyage and shared this with the Kingdom of Spain:

“They are so naive and so free with their possessions that no one who has not witnessed them would believe it. When you ask for something they have, they never say no. To the contrary, they offer to share with anyone….”

 

Catholic Conquest:

On May 4, 1493, the beginning of the Spanish Conquest took place with the approval of Pope Alexander VI. The Pope stated that any land not inhabited by Christians was available to be “discovered,” claimed and exploited by Christian rulers and declared that “the Catholic faith and the Christian religion be exalted and be everywhere increased and spread, that the health of the souls be cared for and barbarous nations overthrown and brought to faith itself.”

This became known as the “Doctrine of Discovery” and became the basis for all European claims in the Americas and continued with the United States western expansion in the 1800’s. As a United States Supreme Court case in 1823 states that “the principle of discover gave European nations an absolute right to New World lands.”

Basically stating the American Indians had no right to their land. And, it was not until 1924 in which “Native Americans” were allowed citizenship. I quote the term Native Americans to highlight the irony of not being granted citizenship to their homeland until 450 years after the Europeans tried to wipe out their civilization.

Following his first voyage, Pope Alexander VI granted the new world to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, claiming:

“We of our own motion, and not at your solicitation, do give, concede, and assign for ever to you and your successors, all the islands, and main lands, discovered; and which may hereafter, be discovered, towards the west and south; whether they be situated towards India, or towards any other part whatsoever, and give you absolute power in them.”

 

Later, as word of the mistreatment of the natives reached the Spanish Kingdom, Queen Isabella finally made a “Stand.” She proclaimed that the Natives shall be given the opportunity of converting to Catholicism before being forced into slavery.

But, claiming slaves of anyone non-Christian was not a new trade. Back in 1455, the Pope issued a statement allowing Portugal to enslave any non-Christians. Columbus got started in his slave trading back in 1480’s as he sailed along the West coast of Africa picking up slaves for the Portuguese kingdom.

And on his third voyage, Columbus was the first to bring African slaves to the new world in the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola) with his claim that “one African slave is equal to four Indians.”

By 1514, the Spanish Conquistadors carried with them an ultimatum entitled, “The Requirement,” in which the Indians were forced to accept, “the Church as the Ruler and Superior of the whole world.” The Requirement warned the natives the consequences for non-compliance:

“We shall take you and your wives and your children, and shall make slaves of them, and as such shall sell and dispose of them as their Highnesses may command; and we shall take away your goods, and shall do all the harm and damage that we can.”

 

 

 

Second Voyage:

The King and Queen of Spain were eager to fund a second voyage following Columbus’s reports of the first trip to the new world. In his largely exaggerated accounts he shared:

“Hispaniola is a miracle. Mountains and hills, plains and pastures, are both fertile and beautiful … the harbors are unbelievably good and there are many wide rivers of which the majority contain gold. . . . There are many spices, and great mines of gold and other metals….”

Columbus returned in 1493 to find the fort at La Navidad burnt to the ground and all 39 men were killed. It was reported that these men apparently had “Misbehaved.” And, of course, by misbehave it is meant they raped all the women and children and tried to steal whatever they could get hands on. In hindsight, leaving 39 released criminals into a land with no rules and laws it should not have surprised Columbus.

The Spaniards retaliated and Columbus forced anyone age 14 or older to work in the mine fields daily searching for gold. If they refused, they were killed. If they did not meet quotas each month – they had hands and arms amputated. Many began committing suicide to avoid the tortures of the Spaniards, while others were buried alive for refusing to oblige to Columbus. The Taino were being killed by starvation, worked to death, disease, or murder. The women were all given to the Spaniards to do as they chose.

Columbus wrote of the innocence of the Natives and his intent to sell them into the slave trade:

“Naked as the day they were born, they show no more embarrassment than animals.” Columbus later wrote: “Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold.”

With not enough gold to return to Spain, Columbus rounded up the best one-thousand Taino he could find. He gave half to the Spanish colonists and took the other half to be sold to the slave trade in Spain. While 250 of the 500 died en route back to Spain, the conquistadors simply tossed them overboard. With much disorder among the colonists at this time, Columbus left his brothers in charge of the islands as he returned to Spain.

 

Third Voyage:

 

Upon his return, the island was in more disarray than when he left. Columbus embarked on daily beatings, raping, feeding infants to wild animals, and progressing the sex trade of children. Columbus began selling girls as young as nine years old into the sex trade as accounted in his writings:

“A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand.”

 

As word got back to Spain, the King and Queen had Columbus and his brothers arrested and shipped back to Spain. At the same time, a man named Bartolome De Las Casas was aboard the third voyage with Columbus and was the first to speak out about the crimes against humanity in the new world.

While settling into Hispaniola in hopes of fortune in the new world, La Casas was a slave owner himself until 1509 in which he started speaking out against the crime. However, he still believed in converting those to Christianity but in a peaceful, non-violent way. While it was applauded by the royalty of Spain, it was simply not followed by the Conquistadors.

La Casas wrote of these atrocities:

“Endless testimonies . .. prove the mild and pacific temperament of the natives…. But our work was to exasperate, ravage, kill, mangle and destroy…

And the Christians, with their horses and swords and pikes began to carry out massacres and strange cruelties against them. They attacked the towns and spared neither the children nor the aged nor pregnant women nor women in childbed, not only stabbing them and dismembering them but cutting them to pieces as if dealing with sheep in the slaughter house. They laid bets as to who, with one stroke of the sword, could split a man in two or could cut off his head or spill out his entrails with a single stroke of the pike. They took infants from their mothers’ breasts, snatching them by the legs and pitching them head first against the crags or snatched them by the arms and threw them into the rivers, roaring with laughter and saying as the babies fell into the water, “Boil there, you offspring of the devil!”

Forgotten Parts of the Legacy:

Columbus was arrested, shipped back to Spain and stripped of all his land and titles of “discoverer.” However, he did find a way to be released and allowed to explore once again – with gold! He presented gold to the King and Queen and was pardoned and allowed a fourth voyage.

He passed away in 1506 always believing he had landed in Asia and no knowledge this was an entirely different continent. During the ten years of his four voyages (1492-1502) the population decreased from 3-8 million inhabitants to less than 50,000. By the mid 1500’s that number was reduced to just 500 remaining Taino.

A liar, crook, thief, rapist, pedophile, savage, torturer, genocidal murder, introducer of slave and sex trades, and conqueror did not discover anything besides a beautiful group of people who rescued him and welcomed him into their home.

The thirst for wealth, greed, and power wiped out generations within a decade. And for his “bravery”; we celebrate the day he invaded the land of the people that rescued him.

Enjoy your paid day off.

Taking the Mask Off” is the new book by Cortland Pfeffer and Irwin Ozborne. Ebook is only 3.99. Cortland Pfeffer spent years as a patient in psychiatric hospitals, treatment centers, and jails before becoming a registered nurse and working in the same facilities. Based on his experience, this story is told from both sides of the desk. It offers a unique and valuable perspective into mental health and addiction, revealing the problems with the psychiatric industry while also providing the solution – one that brings together science, spirituality, philosophy, and personal experience.

“Taking the Mask Off: Destroying the Stigmatic Barriers of Mental Health and Addiction Using a Spiritual Solution” is available on Amazon, and Balboa Press.

Ep 007: We don’t need no medication, with Daniel Carter, the founder of End Psychiatry. Daniel had no history of psychiatric hospitalization, no history of violence and was held on an involuntary commitment for 6 months and given antipsychotics. He shares his experience and why he wants to stop forced psychiatric treatment. Dan also writes music and has a go fund me page to help support his music. His music is at the beginning and the end of this podcast. You can help Dan out at https://www.gofundme.com/help-produce-antipsychiatry-music

You can listen to this episode on ITunes, Sound Cloud, Speaker, Stiticher, and here on WordPress. Links are below:

Sound Cloud:

Spreaker:

Stitcher: 

Stitcher ep007

ITunes:

Itunes Ep 007 We Dont need no medications with Daniel Carter

WordPress:

Ep 007 We Dont need no Medication with Daniel Carter